Climate

Observing phytoplankton via satellite

Sentinel 3A satellite on orbit. Credit: ESA/ATG Medialab Thanks to a new algorithm, researchers at the AWI can now use satellite data to determine in which parts of the ocean certain types of phytoplankton are dominant. In addition, they can identify toxic algal blooms and assess the effects of global warming on marine plankton, allowing…

Nutrient pollution and ocean warming negatively affect early life of corals

A swimming (bottom) and settling (top) coral larvae. The brown spots in the larvae are the symbiont algae, which this coral inherited from its parent. Credit: Raphael Ritson-Williams Corals are constantly exposed to multiple environmental stressors at any given time. On a global scale, climate change is increasing seawater temperatures which can cause coral to…

As the ocean warms, marine species relocate toward the poles: study

Credit: CC0 Public Domain A global analysis of over 300 marine species spanning more than 100 years, shows that mammals, plankton, fish, plants and seabirds have been changing in abundance as our climate warms. At the cool edge of species ranges marine life is doing well as warming opens up habitat that was previously inaccessible,…

Even after a frigid winter, Arctic sea ice is still really low

Image: noaa By Mark Kaufman2020-03-27 20:15:48 UTC Large parts of the U.S. experienced a pretty wimpy winter this year, thanks to cold air staying parked over the Arctic.  This made for a relatively frigid winter season in the high north, which is good for making sea ice. Although Arctic sea ice this season reached its…

Climate change: ‘Gob-smacking’ vision for future UK transport

Image copyright Getty Images People in the UK need to shift from cars to public transport to address the challenge of climate change, the government says.Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said: “Public transport and active travel will be the natural first choice for our daily activities. “We will use our cars less and be able to…

Hotter Days May Leave You More Stressed, Depressed

Photo: GettyThe world is warming. That’s no secret. Extreme heat isn’t only dangerous for our physical health, though. New research shows hotter days may hurt our mental health as well.A study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One adds to a growing body of literature showing the way the climate crisis could harm individual mental health…

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